How some of Australia’s most notorious criminals are offered a Pfizer injection in front of you

How some of Australia’s most notorious criminals are offered a Pfizer injection in front of you

How some of Australia’s most heinous criminals are being offered a Pfizer injection – including the killer Daniel Morecomb and his wife killer Gerard Baden Clay

  • Granting notorious criminals the right to vaccinations in front of law-abiding citizens
  • Among them are the murderer of the wife Gerard Baden Clay and the murderer of Daniel Morecomb
  • Many across the country found it difficult to book appointments with Pfizer
  • There is an abundant amount of AstraZeneca, which can be given instead
  • Prisoners in NSW refuse offers of vaccinations because of their religious beliefs


A number of Australia’s most notorious inmates – including killer Daniel Morecomb Brett Cowan and his murderous wife Gerard Baden Clay – are preparing to receive… Pfizer Punches in front of many law-abiding citizens.

While there is abundance AstraZeneca Vaccines In Australia, there is a limited supply from Pfizer, with appointments scarce for both young and old who want a particular injection.

but for Queensland Inmates, the Pfizer vaccine is widely given to inmates by the state health immunization clinic as well as prison health services personnel.

Queensland Health declined to confirm how many inmates have been vaccinated, but a spokesperson later said that “vaccinations for inmates and correctional services staff in Queensland have been under way for several months – and will continue to be implemented gradually”.

The news is likely to raise questions about why criminals have not given the AstraZeneca injection, of which Australia has millions of spare doses and is fully effective.

Baden Clay murdered his wife Alison in 2012, while Cowan murdered 13-year-old Daniel Morecomb in 2003. Both men are serving life sentences.

Notorious Australian prisoner Brett Cowan, who murdered Daniel Morecomb on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, can receive Pfizer vaccine in front of law-abiding citizens of the Sunshine state

Fellow Queenslander Gerard Baden Clay, who killed his wife Alison, can get an injection before Queenslanders

Fellow Queenslander Gerard Baden Clay, who killed his wife Alison, can get an injection before Queenslanders

In New South Wales, where Covid case numbers continue to rise, the exact vaccination rates behind bars remain a mystery.

come next Barclay Prison, in northwest Sydney, and Cessnock Correctional Center in Hunter Valley, were both recently put on urgent closure after 12 inmates were found to have COVID-19 in Barclay.

Some prisoners had contact with other prisoners now residing at Cesnock, endangering both centers.

Other inmates at Lithgow Correctional Centre, in central New South Wales, are reported to be refusing requests for vaccinations due to religious beliefs.

The standoff has left some NSW corrections staff on edge, as they do not have the powers to impose vaccinations on inmates.

‘Prison officers understand the risks of Covid-19 and want to be vaccinated,’ said Nicole Jess, president of the NSW Public Service Association.

The challenge is the presentation. PSA has asked NSW Health for more on-site vaccinations for prison officers.

In one recent case, an officer from Barclay Prison confirmed that inmates gave priority when there was a shortage of vaccinations for inmates and staff.

The current full vaccination rate in Australia is just under 28 per cent.

Once the nation hits the 80 per cent average – which could be the end of 2021 based on current numbers – life will slowly return to normal according to several country leaders.

Once Australia's vaccination rate reaches 80 per cent, state leaders pledge that life will then return to normal (Stocked Image)

Once Australia’s vaccination rate reaches 80 per cent, state leaders pledge that life will then return to normal (Stocked Image)

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