People are turning to solar power as Lebanon’s fuel crisis, power outages worsen

People are turning to solar power as Lebanon’s fuel crisis, power outages worsen

Amid a deteriorating fuel crisis in Lebanon and increasing power outages, Lebanese citizen Mohammad Chehab found relief by installing solar power in his home to supply him and his family with electricity 24 hours a day.

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As the country suffers from what the World Bank has described as one of the deepest depressions in modern history, shortage of fuel this month have resulted in state-powered electricity being available for barely a few hours a day.

“The pressure and stress we feel from a power outage, whether it be from the family or yourself coming home, no power, no light and no cold water to drink, especially in summer, is in itself a good reason to look for an alternative source of electricity,” said the drone operator in his thirties.

The solution for renewable energyWhile not new to Lebanon and the world, it has become more popular in Lebanon in recent months despite a worsening economic and financial crisis that has hit the small country in the Middle East.

Mohammad Chehab sits under a solar panel he installed at his home in Khaldeh, Lebanon, on August 25, 2021. Photo taken on August 25, 2021. (Reuters)

One company that installs solar panel systems, Mectric Engineers, had to double their installation teams from two to four. According to co-founder and manager Alain Bou Nasr, half of the people who call them now for information are buying it — compared to “maybe 5 percent” previously.

“Unfortunately, people have been waiting for this crisis to switch to an alternative flow that is clean and profitable… On the positive side, people have come to know about this (solution) and have found that in Lebanon we have more than 300 sunny days and that we can rely on it on sun for more than 10 months a year, this is positive, people are starting to install,” said Bou Nasr.

Lebanon’s Worsening Fuel Crisis has reached a painful breaking point, with bakeries, businesses and hospitals scaling back or completely shutting down their operations, making life even harder for Lebanese already experiencing a financial collapse.

With the heating oil that powers Lebanon gone from the market, Lebanese are sweltering in the summer heat with no lights or air-conditioning, routinely tossing the contents of fridges while having to set aside hours to fill up the car – as petrol becomes increasingly scarce. was can be found.

The Lebanese army seizes dozens of plastic cans stored with fuel at gas stations.  (Photo courtesy: The Armed Forces of Lebanon)

The Lebanese army seizes dozens of plastic cans stored with fuel at gas stations. (Photo courtesy: The Armed Forces of Lebanon)

Many say that living conditions are worse than during the 1975-90 civil war.

It marks a new low in the financial crisis that erupted in late 2019, the result of decades of corruption and mismanagement by a ruling elite that has failed to find solutions as more than half of the population has sunk into poverty.

Read more:

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